Principles of Naturism

You often hear claims that Naturists have high standards of personal conduct and principals that would seem to be intended to justify their social nudity to others who may not otherwise understand or accept the concept. The claims are usually embedded in articles and essays but rarely listed definitively. This article is an attempt to clearly list those principals with minimal fluff or attempt at justification. No group of people (including Naturists) will agree on everything. Some may argue with individual points or wording but in general the following list is applicable.

  • We believe the natural human body is inherently decent and good and not shameful.
  • There is nothing harmful for anyone to view another uncovered.
  • We do not suffer from the unnatural fear of nudity presented by the majority.
  • Nudity is not inherently sexual.
  • Those that sexualize nudity seem (by our standards) deviant and prurient.
  • We do not feel the need to habitually hide ourselves in fabric unless needed for practical reasons.
  • We realize and respect the vast differences in human form.
  • We accept the bodies of others as they are without judgment or expectation.
  • We believe nudity is healthy and natural for all ages and fear of nudity leads to harmful prurience.
  • We marvel in awe at the amazing machine which we all posses.
  • Sexual behavior in a social nudity context is demeaning and unacceptable and should be kept private.
  • Nudity has physical and mental health benefits.
  • Naturism does not require the practice of social nudity per se, however it is common.
  • We believe there are no bad parts – breasts, genitalia and elbows are all natural and equal.
  • Nudity is not antithetical to modesty.
  • Oh. We sit on towels and should be asked before photos are taken.

The act of being nude in nature, especially with like minded individuals is indescribably empowering and liberating. It takes little time to shed the generations of expectations of concealment and realize the easy natural connection to your environment that has been missing all along. With that void filled, you readily accept the natural and diverse form of others as an extension of the environment and find that you also accept everything about yourself. The confidence and equivalent humility changes your perception forever. When you no longer view the status of others by clothes or looks, you begin to really view the character and humanity of the individual. This understanding leads to a trust and connection to virtual strangers not attainable in the superficial world of fabric.

 –< R JGenie-smallNatural >–

 

 

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